Okavango Delta, Botswana

NGYO4091

We spent a few days in the Okavango Delta, a marshy river filled with reeds and water lilies. We traveled to our bush camp in a mokoro, a canoe carved out of a tree trunk, poled by a local guide. The first night we stayed on Makoba Island, named for the local word for the acacia tree that is prominent on the island. The islands in the delta are formed from termite mounds that coalesce into a large land base. The termite mounds are also used as direction guides since they always lean toward the west.

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3 thoughts on “Okavango Delta, Botswana

  1. That looked like a fun and peaceful ride! Do your guides speak English? Do you always sleep in tents? Do you prepare your own meals during this journey or are they all prepared for you? I have lots of questions!!

    1. Our guide and crew all speak English fluently. We slept in tents all but a few days (around 6 nights) during our 48 day trip. We are divided into three groups to help with chores: cooking, dishwashing, and truck cleaning. We had a cook who did the bulk of the actual cooking. We just helped with chopping.

      1. Wow, fascinating! I wouldnt mind being a part of the crew and helping out, that’s cool. You must have made some great friends. But, I am not sure I could sleep in a tent for so long! To me, not having a mattress, flush toilet and warm shower every day would be really challenging. Seems very vulnerable with the wild animals so close. Were you safe? You are very brave!!

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